Classic Cars

The most desirable and valuable car in the world, the Ferrari 250 GTO is surrounded with intrigue and myth. All of the 36 cars produced from 1962 to 1964 have survived and are accounted for, and most remarkably the history of every example is well documented. Up until the early 1970s, the GTO was regarded as an obsolete racing car. Since then prices have steeply risen to 10 digits in Pounds, Dollars and Euros. Ferrari 250 GTO in 1963, the model with 2-door fastback coupe body and V-12 2953 cm3 / 179.3 cui engine size, 220.5 kW / 300 PS / 296 hp (max) offered up to mid-year 1963 for Europe racing/rallye Specifications listing with fuel economy, top speed, performance factory data estimation: this Ferrari would accelerate 0-60 mph in 4.4 sec, 0-100 km/h in 4.6 sec, 0-200 km/h in 16.7 sec and quarter mile time is 12.7 sec.

Body Style: Mileage: Transmission: Specs:
Convertible KM 6-Speed Auto 2-Passenger, 2-Door
Price:€ POA

The Mercedes-Benz 300SL stands as one of most memorable coupes of the fifties. The gullwing doors not only distinguished it, but they are a clever solution to hide the cars unique space frame chassis. It’s also the most recognizable Mercedes and every seriously collection usually has one. The Gullwing Coupe, also known as the W194, was the first true sports-car to be developed by Daimler-Benz after the war. It was introduced in 1952 as a lightweight race car to compete in Mille Milia. In September 1953 the road-going development of 300SL began. It was presented in February of 1954 at the International Motor Sports Show in New York, based on the racing-car of the 1952 season.

Body Style: Mileage: Transmission: Specs:
Coupe KM 6-Speed Auto 2-Passenger, 2-Door
Price:€ POA

The second generation Miura was released at the 1968 Turin Motor Show with a number of detail upgrades both in and out of the car. It shared the same potent transverse V12 engine and Bertine-designed body from its predecessor released three years earlier. Inside Lamborghini fitted power windows to the Miura S and also offered optional air conditioning for the first time. Detail differences included a locking glove box. The engine also received am overhaul which was good for 20 additional horsepower. This included new intake manifolds and different camshafts. Outside, the car received a new chrome trim piece around the window locking strip. Around 140 cars of this type were produced.

Body Style: Mileage: Transmission: Specs:
Coupe KM 6-Speed Auto 2-Passenger, 2-Door
Price:€ POA

The 250 GT SWB used a body very similar to those of the 250 GT LWB Interim Berlinetta campaigned throughout the 1960 season. The largest visual difference between the two is the lack of the Interim's fixed rear quarter windows on the SWB. The new chassis was similar in design to the 250 GTs raced in the 1950s but the wheelbase was shortened by 20 mm to 2400 mm, hence Short Wheelbase (SWB). A wheelbase of 2400 mm is considered as the ideal length, to allow for good cornering characteristics (the shorter, the better) and straight-line stability (the longer, the better). It is not a coincidence that the most successful racer ever, the Bugatti Type 35, has a 2400 mm wheelbase. Another major improvement was the replacement of drum brakes by discs, all around. This was the first time the factory equipped discs appeared on a 250 GT. The Ferrari 250 GT SWB is a rear wheel drive automobile, with its motor placed in the front, and a 2 door coupé body designed by Pininfarina. Powering the Ferrari 250 GT SWB is a single overhead camshaft, 3 litre naturally aspirated 12 cylinder powerplant, with 2 valves per cylinder that provides power and torque figures of 276 bhp (280 PS/206 kW) at 7000 rpm and 260 N·m (192 lb·ft/26.5 kgm) at 6000 rpm respectively. The engine delivers its power through to the wheels via a 4 speed manual transmission. The stated weight at the kerb is 957 kg. It is said to be able to achieve a maxiumum speed of 270 km/h (168 mph).

Body Style: Mileage: Transmission: Specs:
Coupe KM 6-Speed Auto 2-Passenger, 2-Door
Price:€ POA

250 TDF Ferrari’s top of the line street car of the era, which was comparatively mass produced. For competition purposes, however, an aluminum lightweight, aerodynamic body clothed the 250 drive train and chassis, and these cars become known by the moniker “TdF”, representing the namesake of the great French endurance contest which was a combination of many days of circuit and road racing. TdFs won the Tour de France outright no less than three times consecutively in 1957, 1958, and 1959. Additionally, Olivier Gendebien piloted his 250 TdF to third overall against many purpose-built sports racing cars in the final period running of the Mille Miglia. Technical specification: 2-door coupe body type RWD (rear-wheel drive), manual 4-speed gearbox petrol (gasoline) engine with displacement: 2953 cm3 / 179.3 cui, advertised power: 191 kW / 256 hp / 260 PS ( max ), torque: 314 Nm / 232 lb-ft characteristic dimensions: outside length: 4450 mm / 175.2 in, wheelbase: 2600 mm / 102.4 in reference weights: base curb weight: 1070 kg / 2359 lbs top speed: 240 km/h (149 mph) (declared by factory); accelerations: 0- 60 mph 5.1 s; 0- 100 km/h 5.4 s (simulation; 1/4 mile drag time (402 m) 13.6 s fuel consumption and mileage: average estimated by a-c: 17 l/100km / 16.6 mpg (imp.) / 13.8 mpg (U.S.) / 5.9 km/l

Body Style: Mileage: Transmission: Specs:
Coupe KM 6-Speed Auto 2-Passenger, 2-Door
Price:€ POA